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A very uncomfortable question for Republicans June 8, 2009

Posted by Paige of Quarrel in we're only gonna die.
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Update: It looks like Keith Olbermann brought up this question in his #1 spot on tonight’s show.  Nice.

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Two seemingly unrelated news items:

#1 – In an ABC News/Washington Post poll conducted May 20-23, 55% of Republicans (and 38% of Democrats) say physical abuse of terror suspects is sometimes OK.  Approximately 40% also support torture (compared to 27% of Dems).  We know that the majority of Republicans consistently poll as being opposed to abortion, and, as shown in the debate over recent abortion poll numbers in May, an arguably growing number of them believing it should never be legal even in cases where the woman’s health is in danger, a position that’s been pegged lately at around 20%.  Even though anecdotal evidence would say that the 20% who think abortion should never be legal and the 40% who support torture are probably far more aligned, let’s assume a minimum of around 8% of Republicans identify with both.  Even with this estimate, we know a number of high profile Republicans and commentators are definitely in this group.  Think Fox News channel.

#2 – Scott Roeder called the AP from Sedgwick County Jail to say that he has not been cooperating with investigators and will not until he speaks with his lawyer. He also said, “I know there are many other similar events planned around the country as long as abortion remains legal.”

This looks to me like the question to ask Fox News channel types right now: Roeder represents exactly the type of so-called “ticking time bomb” scenerio you’ve been using to justify torture of terror suspects.  Roeder is an anti-abortion terrorist, not a lone actor, and says he has knowledge of other “events planned around the country.”  He’s not talking right now.  To prevent the further loss of life in these other attacks, should we be torturing Scott Roeder for information right now?

If they could manage to answer that in anything that even resembles a cogent argument, they’re bound to lose some single-issue voters one way or the other.  I know they won’t be asked and I know they wouldn’t really answer, but this is yet another wedge in the fractured Republican Party.  The point should be pressed by the left wing, and it should be pressed now while both sides rally over healthcare.